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Common Read: 2018-2019 Latehomecomer: Home

Please join the conversation and read, explore, and research The Latehomecomer, by Kao Kalia Yang.

The Late Homecomer

  • SUMMARY: Presents the journey from refuge camp to America and the hardships and joys of a family's struggle to adapt in a strange culture while holding onto traditions that are passed down from her beloved grandmother.
  • CONTENTS: Seeking refuge -- A walk in the jungle -- Enemy camp -- Refugees -- Ban Vinai refugee camp -- The second leaving -- Phanat Nikhom transition camp to America -- A return to the clouds -- Before the babies -- Coming of the son -- The haunted section-8 house -- Our moldy house -- When the tiger comes -- Preparations -- Goodbye to grandma -- Walking back alone -- Hmong in America.

About the Book

Overview

Kao Kalia Yang is a Hmong-American author, filmmaker, public speaker, and natural storyteller. The Latehomecomer: A Hmong Family Memoir (Coffee House Press, 2008) is the first memoir written by a Hmong-American to be published with national distribution. Driven to tell her family's story—and the story of the Hmong people—Yang wrote it as a "love letter" to her grandmother whose spirit held her family together through their imprisonment in Laos, their harrowing escape across the Mekong River and into a refugee camp in Thailand, their immigration to Minnesota when Yang was only six years old, and their transition to a hard life in America. "Yang has performed an important service in bringing readers the stories of a people whose history has been shamefully neglected," writes Kirkus. "Yang tells her family's story with grace; she narrates their struggles, beautifully weaving in Hmong folklore and culture. By the end of this moving, unforgettable book, when Yang describes the death of her beloved grandmother, readers will delight at how intimately they have become part of this formerly ... [unfamiliar] culture" (Publishers Weekly, starred review).

Creating Common Ground: Common Reading and the First Year of College

https://www.aacu.org/publications-research/periodicals/creating-common-ground-common-reading-and-first-year-college

The practice of assigning incoming students “common reading”—asking them to read the same book before they arrive on campus—has gained popularity in recent years as colleges and universities have sought new ways to improve the first-year experience.